Today I learned...

FOR SCIENCE!
naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:25 pm

Really? There was a study on crayfish that involved electrifying them so they avoided the places where they got shocked at. To me that sounds like they felt pain. I think creatures with nervous systems have the vanity to feel pain. We might not have pain receptors on our brain, but our nerves carry signals of pain, arthropods also have nervous systems, so wouldn't their nerves also send signals of pain?
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magmacube_tr
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by magmacube_tr » Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:42 pm

naturegirl1999 wrote:
Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:25 pm
Really? There was a study on crayfish that involved electrifying them so they avoided the places where they got shocked at. To me that sounds like they felt pain. I think creatures with nervous systems have the vanity to feel pain. We might not have pain receptors on our brain, but our nerves carry signals of pain, arthropods also have nervous systems, so wouldn't their nerves also send signals of pain?
So you are saying that cause of pain can be registrated as pain :?: Actually that makes sense.
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White parrot
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by White parrot » Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:55 pm

naturegirl1999 wrote:
Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:25 pm
Really? There was a study on crayfish that involved electrifying them so they avoided the places where they got shocked at. To me that sounds like they felt pain. I think creatures with nervous systems have the vanity to feel pain. We might not have pain receptors on our brain, but our nerves carry signals of pain, arthropods also have nervous systems, so wouldn't their nerves also send signals of pain?
I personally tend to agree with this point of view: to me pain is a function more than a specific mechanism, and thus can be fulfilled by potentially different systems, in the same way that birds and insects can both fly although the organs called "wings" have radically different origins. Behaviour is a better indicator.
Beside there kinda is an history of denying animals the capacities for feeling or thinking, so for a change I prefer to err on the opposite side. :roll:
At this point, we shouldn't be surprised by anything nature does. She's like a meth addict whose drug-fueled rampages unfold in slow motion and span millions of years.
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naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:25 pm

White parrot wrote:
Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:55 pm
naturegirl1999 wrote:
Fri Nov 09, 2018 12:25 pm
Really? There was a study on crayfish that involved electrifying them so they avoided the places where they got shocked at. To me that sounds like they felt pain. I think creatures with nervous systems have the vanity to feel pain. We might not have pain receptors on our brain, but our nerves carry signals of pain, arthropods also have nervous systems, so wouldn't their nerves also send signals of pain?
I personally tend to agree with this point of view: to me pain is a function more than a specific mechanism, and thus can be fulfilled by potentially different systems, in the same way that birds and insects can both fly although the organs called "wings" have radically different origins. Behaviour is a better indicator.
Beside there kinda is an history of denying animals the capacities for feeling or thinking, so for a change I prefer to err on the opposite side. :roll:
I notice this too. I'm confused why people still think other animals can't think. To me it makes no sense to assume that we know what other animals are thinking. For all we know, birds might be studying how we build our complicated nests of corners and lines and stairways and why our wings are modified to grab things. (We call bird wings modified arms, so it makes sense for birds to think our arms are modified wings, right?)
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Prudentia
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by Prudentia » Fri Nov 16, 2018 11:14 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leach%27s_storm_petrel

These curious bastards have an unique trick. As they age, their telomeres lengthen.
Black Rockfish, Sebastes melanops, ~12 inches, of the coast of Newport, Oregon.

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White parrot
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by White parrot » Sun Nov 18, 2018 10:23 pm

Prudentia wrote:
Fri Nov 16, 2018 11:14 pm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leach%27s_storm_petrel

These curious bastards have an unique trick. As they age, their telomeres lengthen.
Ahem...

DOCTORS HATE THEM!!!! THESE CURIOUS BASTARDS HAVE A UNIQUE TRICK AGAINST AGEING!!!
CLICK HERE TO LEARN IT!!!

Something like this? :mrgreen:
At this point, we shouldn't be surprised by anything nature does. She's like a meth addict whose drug-fueled rampages unfold in slow motion and span millions of years.
Silly Otter wrote:Welcome to the forum.
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Prudentia
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by Prudentia » Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:24 am

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/artic ... ne.0201193

So this paper came out in September in which the Authors allege that the U.S illegal immigrant/resident population is more like 16-22 million than the commonly accepted 11 ish million.
Things is,m they basically alleges that the illegal population has been underestimated for a long time. The odds that the DHS of four administrations and basically every company that conducts any sort of research polling have been systematically underestimating this population for twenty six years is lower. You are twice as likely to killed and eaten by two different sharks, Struck by lightning twice, and winning the U.S Powerball twice (~ 7.03*10^-23) than for the illegal population to have been systematically under estimated for twenty six years (at least 2.22*10^-42).
Ridiculous, right?

And funny tid bit, about 34% of illegal immigrants work in either production or construction. So Trumps economic and ecological policies proportionately benefit illegal immigrants more than legal blue collar workers.


And in these wierdos, male choose females based on their coloration.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-spotted_goby
Black Rockfish, Sebastes melanops, ~12 inches, of the coast of Newport, Oregon.

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magmacube_tr
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by magmacube_tr » Wed Nov 21, 2018 6:02 pm

...That each of a octopuses arms has a brain of itself. They calculate the complex movements on the arm they are on.
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Tiberius
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by Tiberius » Fri Nov 23, 2018 10:36 pm

Human Echolocation is powered by the visual region of the brain, and does not invoilve any activity in the audtitory region of the brain.

naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Fri Nov 23, 2018 11:36 pm

Tiberius wrote:
Fri Nov 23, 2018 10:36 pm
Human Echolocation is powered by the visual region of the brain, and does not invoilve any activity in the audtitory region of the brain.
How do humans echolocate?
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