Warm Oceans=Supersharks?

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JDaileyGreatLakes
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Warm Oceans=Supersharks?

Post by JDaileyGreatLakes » Wed Jun 29, 2016 9:11 pm

In the history of vertebrate life, the early-to-mid Eocene had got to be the hottest chapter. The average global surface temperature was 73 degrees Fahrenheit, so warm that seasonality must have been far less pronounced than it is today. Which means that the oceans may have been, uniformly, as warm as a bath.

The Miocene, though not even close to being as warm as the Eocene, was still a hothouse chapter in Earth's history. And it was during the Miocene that the world's oceans were lorded over by the largest shark ever found--the infamous Megalodon, 50 feet at the longest and almost 50 tons.

So let's go to an alternate Eocene, where the surface average was still 73 degrees Fahrenheit, where oceans as warm as baths were typical and where seasons were subdued. Could these conditions have been ideal for predatory sharks as large as Megalodon?

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Re: Warm Oceans=Supersharks?

Post by 20 characters! » Thu Jun 30, 2016 12:29 am

No, Sharks weren't that huge in the Miocene, I thought megolodon was a Pliocene animal. In the Oligocene Sharks were predated on my large predatory whales...right?

From everything I've heard, see temperature had nothing to do with me. Mama said something like make it actually regulated body temperature fairly well, rather the disappear predators large combined it's the new abundance of gigantic filter feeding whales lead to an unexploited niche, thus a giant shark specifically preyd on whales happened.

I could be wrong but I never got the impression that has anything to do with sea temperatures
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Prudentia
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Re: Warm Oceans=Supersharks?

Post by Prudentia » Thu Jun 30, 2016 3:33 am

20 characters! wrote:No, Sharks weren't that huge in the Miocene, I thought megolodon was a Pliocene animal. In the Oligocene Sharks were predated on my large predatory whales...right?

From everything I've heard, see temperature had nothing to do with me. Mama said something like make it actually regulated body temperature fairly well, rather the disappear predators large combined it's the new abundance of gigantic filter feeding whales lead to an unexploited niche, thus a giant shark specifically preyd on whales happened.

I could be wrong but I never got the impression that has anything to do with sea temperatures
Not wrong at all. Bigger sharks tend to appear in colder, mostly because how easy gigantothermy is to evolve, and how physiologically cheap it is. Megalodon was Miocene through late pliocene. The greater body of evidence indicates that a combination of biotic factors were the primary drivers of extinction. While temperature may have played a slight role, that role is slight. Due to their size, Megalodon would have been able to accomplish extraordinary feats of homeostasis due to its size (gigantothermy).

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 16C.f04t03
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