Today I learned...

FOR SCIENCE!
naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Sun Mar 10, 2019 12:30 am

Today I learned that a Designated pilot examiner (dpe) is a senior pilot who examines applicants for piloting certification on behalf of the Federal Aviation Authority
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White parrot
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by White parrot » Fri Mar 15, 2019 2:38 am

So apparently some viruses (viri?) spread their genetic material across multiple capsids, which each proceeds to infect their own cells. As a result, the proteins necessary to replicate the whole thing are produced in different cells, and must somehow be smuggled from cell to cell so that functional viri are produced indeed.
As often in matters of evolution, intermediate steps are still around: viral population in which a lot of individuals don't have a full genomes, and just rely on one of their neighbour having the missing part to complete them.
It reminds me of a caste system, but in viral particles. Nature is weird!
At this point, we shouldn't be surprised by anything nature does. She's like a meth addict whose drug-fueled rampages unfold in slow motion and span millions of years.
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naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Fri Mar 15, 2019 1:47 pm

Agreed, also, some Wolbachoa bacteria can turn males into females, or make them only mate with infected females, since it can only pass from the mothers
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naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Thu Mar 21, 2019 2:52 pm

Today I learned that a plasmid in arches may be on its way to becoming a virus
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source= ... uyEkP5r1Nw
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magmacube_tr
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by magmacube_tr » Thu Mar 21, 2019 6:10 pm

I learned today that goldfishes has no stomaches. There is no limit of their appetite.
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naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Thu Apr 04, 2019 2:11 pm

Today I learned that Bombyx mori is domesticated from Bombyx mandarina. Thay can produce hybrids, and I'm not sure why they are considered separate species while other domesticated animals are considered the same species as the wild counterparts. Also the reason I found for this is that B. mori is completely dependant on humans for survival and reproduction giving it reproductive isolation.
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Alexcat989
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by Alexcat989 » Wed Apr 10, 2019 7:54 am

TIL that Woodlice taste of strong urine. This was not from experience.
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Prudentia
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by Prudentia » Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:56 pm

New human relative. Study found signs of habitation in a cave on Luzon, Phillipines, going back almost 700,000 years. Small hominid, less with a variety of strange traits. Their premolar teeth appear to have three roots, compared to our one. Lot of evidence for Homo luzonensis!

To be clear, there remains are 50-67 thousand years old, and they found 700000 year old stone tools.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1067-9
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technolo ... smsnnews11
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