Today I learned...

FOR SCIENCE!
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by 20 characters! » Sat Jan 05, 2019 2:56 am

https://www.popularmechanics.com/scienc ... oeba-math/

That amebas are still amazingly useful organisms.
youtubeuserSara3346
20 characters! wrote:*explodes into a gore shower
combi2 wrote: ... thought that all cows could produce unlimited antibodies,boy am i a retard.
combi2 wrote:you can`t thats not how humans work
Grockstar wrote:Bats it is then. They are the poor man's snake.
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by 20 characters! » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:00 am

That some native Americans bred these adorable looking little dogs for their wool and that sadly they're all gone now. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salish_Wool_Dog

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hare_Indian_Dog That domestic coyotes may have been a thing, possibly, or at least that these seem like a fairly distinct dog lineage which Is sadly also extinct


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Eskimo_Dog And that the Canadian government wants to pretend it didn't try and wipe out these little cutie patooties.
youtubeuserSara3346
20 characters! wrote:*explodes into a gore shower
combi2 wrote: ... thought that all cows could produce unlimited antibodies,boy am i a retard.
combi2 wrote:you can`t thats not how humans work
Grockstar wrote:Bats it is then. They are the poor man's snake.
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by 20 characters! » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:11 am

Prudentia wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:54 am
Spider?

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/05/scie ... urope.html
Important to note, parthenogenic animals are no longer considered species, only forms, since they are not really a group of interbreeding individuals so much as tumors that sprouted limbs and fell off.
Interesting addendum, the first separated human cancer cells, are now genetically distinct enough to be awarded a new family. Theorectically. But because they just represent 50 years of uncontrolled cancer cell division, and due an unpredictable mutation rate it can not be labelled a new species.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HeLa#New_species_proposal


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/ ... smsnnews11
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/jedek-previous ... ia-1659566

Later today, after my systematics of mammalogy midterm, will post some my notes from my population class because it is some really interesting stuff. Onto studying f*cking rodent skulls and pelts! Yay.... Please... Kill me.

Oh, on that note, some species of chipmunk can only be identified by their os baculum, or penis bone. Literally translates to bone penis.
That seems an absurd standard, don't we classify many bacteria as separate species despite asexual reproduction and aphids too, aren't there some lizards that ONLY reproduce asexually...not counting such as propper species despite being distinct lineages strikes me as practically unworkable... If the only difference between some of these chipmunks is how one bone is shaped though...that doesn't sound like its warannting being classified as a separate species, I mean I'm sure you could find some horses with a few extra or fewer or differently shaped bones and we wouldn't count them as separate species.
youtubeuserSara3346
20 characters! wrote:*explodes into a gore shower
combi2 wrote: ... thought that all cows could produce unlimited antibodies,boy am i a retard.
combi2 wrote:you can`t thats not how humans work
Grockstar wrote:Bats it is then. They are the poor man's snake.
ImageImageImage

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Re: Today I learned...

Post by 20 characters! » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:16 am

naturegirl1999 wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 1:26 am
I learned that insects have six legs for a double tripod movement where they lift one leg from one side and two legs from the other side so that the other three legs provide support so it doesn't fall. The internet is educational if you search in the right places for the right questions.
OOh, I used to know a whole website that had several pages about animal gaits including critters with more than for legs and legg than two and for swimming creatures as well, If I can find it I will link it back to you post haste.
youtubeuserSara3346
20 characters! wrote:*explodes into a gore shower
combi2 wrote: ... thought that all cows could produce unlimited antibodies,boy am i a retard.
combi2 wrote:you can`t thats not how humans work
Grockstar wrote:Bats it is then. They are the poor man's snake.
ImageImageImage

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Re: Today I learned...

Post by 20 characters! » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:40 am

20 characters! wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:16 am
naturegirl1999 wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 1:26 am
I learned that insects have six legs for a double tripod movement where they lift one leg from one side and two legs from the other side so that the other three legs provide support so it doesn't fall. The internet is educational if you search in the right places for the right questions.
OOh, I used to know a whole website that had several pages about animal gaits including critters with more than for legs and legg than two and for swimming creatures as well, If I can find it I will link it back to you post haste.
and I found them, I swear he covered monopods once but I can't find that anymore. The swimming and flying sections do not really cover earth animals as examples but are still interesting reads about biomechanics.

Walking
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/walking/bipeds.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/wa ... rupeds.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/wa ... xapods.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/walking/eight.htm

Swimming
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/sw ... flukes.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/sw ... branes.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/swimming/tubes.htm

Flying
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/fl ... erates.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/fl ... opters.htm
http://members.casema.nl/gertvandijk/fl ... llonts.htm
youtubeuserSara3346
20 characters! wrote:*explodes into a gore shower
combi2 wrote: ... thought that all cows could produce unlimited antibodies,boy am i a retard.
combi2 wrote:you can`t thats not how humans work
Grockstar wrote:Bats it is then. They are the poor man's snake.
ImageImageImage

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Re: Today I learned...

Post by 20 characters! » Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:42 am

magmacube_tr wrote:
Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:47 pm
Today I learned that on the 8th layer of the internet, there is a system called Primarch. This system uses a unique coding mechanism that can be only be deciphered with a quantum computer. It sends signals all over the internet, and can instantaneously affect the entire internet. Nobody knows what it looks like, or what its purpose is.
Can we have a link to a respectable article about this?
youtubeuserSara3346
20 characters! wrote:*explodes into a gore shower
combi2 wrote: ... thought that all cows could produce unlimited antibodies,boy am i a retard.
combi2 wrote:you can`t thats not how humans work
Grockstar wrote:Bats it is then. They are the poor man's snake.
ImageImageImage

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Prudentia
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by Prudentia » Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:26 am

20 characters! wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:11 am
Prudentia wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:54 am
Spider?

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/05/scie ... urope.html
Important to note, parthenogenic animals are no longer considered species, only forms, since they are not really a group of interbreeding individuals so much as tumors that sprouted limbs and fell off.
Interesting addendum, the first separated human cancer cells, are now genetically distinct enough to be awarded a new family. Theorectically. But because they just represent 50 years of uncontrolled cancer cell division, and due an unpredictable mutation rate it can not be labelled a new species.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HeLa#New_species_proposal


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/ ... smsnnews11
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/jedek-previous ... ia-1659566

Later today, after my systematics of mammalogy midterm, will post some my notes from my population class because it is some really interesting stuff. Onto studying f*cking rodent skulls and pelts! Yay.... Please... Kill me.

Oh, on that note, some species of chipmunk can only be identified by their os baculum, or penis bone. Literally translates to bone penis.
That seems an absurd standard, don't we classify many bacteria as separate species despite asexual reproduction and aphids too, aren't there some lizards that ONLY reproduce asexually...not counting such as propper species despite being distinct lineages strikes me as practically unworkable... If the only difference between some of these chipmunks is how one bone is shaped though...that doesn't sound like its warannting being classified as a separate species, I mean I'm sure you could find some horses with a few extra or fewer or differently shaped bones and we wouldn't count them as separate species.

Wow, you are really playing catchup. Bacteria get complicated as hell, especially due to horizontal gene transfers. Most Parthenogenic animals are hybrids, and those that aren't have long been speculated to be to the hybrid product of ancient lizard species.
The chipmunks do vary in more than that, but they are all roughly the same size and inhabit the same habitats. However, they do not genetically intermix and are genetically distinct from one another. Just the only way to tell them apart (aside from genotyping) is checking out the size and shape of their dickbone. There is the small matter of what is easier, faster, and cheaper? Catching and taking a genetic sample from field specimens, or catching, killing and dissecting the dicks of field specimens?
Black Rockfish, Sebastes melanops, ~12 inches, of the coast of Newport, Oregon.

naturegirl1999
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Re: Today I learned...

Post by naturegirl1999 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:14 pm

Today I learned that various other animals other than humans and beavers engineer their environment

https://youtu.be/wYPQLsS3ST8
I'm gonna put the last thing I copied here. Will change each time I visit for variety
Peabody Museums Travels in the Great Tree of Life

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